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History

The bikini was launched by a frenchman called Louis Réard in 1946 following the end of the Second World War.

It is rare that a luxury lifestyle brand is in a position to launch with a history dating back 70 years and a story as relevant and iconic today as many decades ago, but with its re-launch in May 2017, that is exactly what luxury resort wear brand REARD Paris is doing.

In 1946, Louis Réard who was working in the car industry, created a garment that embodied the new-found independence many women had acquired in post-war Europe. Strong and liberated for the first time, women were keen to find new ways to express their hope for the future through the clothes they wore. Louis Réard created a unique garment that gave women the means to reflect this sense of fun and freedom and embrace a radical attitude towards attire. 

A natural pioneer and marketer, Louis Réard was wise to the global storm that he was about to create. He named his two-piece design after Bikini Atoll – the test site for the atomic bomb located in the South Pacific. On 5 July 1946 the bikini exploded in to existence with the official launch at the Piscine Molitor in Paris, creating a historical milestone in women’s fashion and lifestyle. His debut design was a daring cut in newsprint fabric, a direct hint to the column inches he was generating.

The evolution of the bikini remains one of fashion’s largest success stories and the rise of celebrity culture in the 1950’s and 1960’s affirmed the bikini as a style icon – images of Marilyn Monroe, Brigitte Bardot and Ursula Andress have proved timeless and continue to gain stature in modern society.

THE RELAUNCH OF AN ICON

With no natural successor to carry on its mantle, REARD Paris disappeared out of view. However, the spirit of the brand remained intact and launched in May 2017 with the same passion and innovative values.

A modern-day Paris atelier, the creative team employ sophisticated craftsmanship and leading edge technology to ensure delivery of the highest quality products, again set to become modern day icons in their own right.